To suddenly know!

I was reading “Gerda Malaperis!” (Gerda disappeared!) by Claude Piron and came across this word: ekscii

Remember that “c”s are pronounced like “ts”s and those two “i”s are pronounced separately! Like:

  • ekst-see-ee

Not only does the word look bizarrely cool, but I thought the meaning was pretty nifty too.

“Ek-” is a prefix usually put on the front of an action, that makes a new word that emphasises the start, or sudden beginning of the action. See my previous post talking about it.

“Scii” (which in itself is a pretty interesting word, it’s the word I have most trouble pronouncing fluently in a sentence, especially when a word ending in “s” comes before it…) means “to know”.

So the result is literally something like “to suddenly know”. More usually translated as “to find out”! I’d been wondering how to say that in Esperanto, given that translating “find” and “out” together makes no sense… Find outside?

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2 thoughts on “To suddenly know!

  1. When I try and pronounce it, it sounds like “ecstasy” 😛

    So, would “to suddenly know” be like the equivalent of say, Eureka!?

    • 😀 Hehe!

      Certainly bears a resemblance, doesn’t it? Though “Eureka!” used in this way is an interjection. “Ekscii” is a verb. I’ve noticed a tendency to make something a root in order to make it an interjection:

      feki = to defecate
      fek! = shit!

      Maybe “eksci” is closer then?

      However:

      There’s a short Esperanto Wikipedia page on Eureka: http://eo.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eŭreka

      They just Esperantify the word. Though they suggest it comes from the greek “I have found” as in “I’ve found it!”.

      So maybe “ektrovi” (ek + trovi) = “to suddenly find/stumble across etc.” Then “ektrov!” (just the root).

      Makes some kind of sense to me! Though I don’t know how readily someone would understand it! I suppose you’d have to explain yourself anyway if you just suddenly shouted “Eŭreka (or Heŭreka)” (though it might be a sufficiently internally recognised for people to know what you mean)!

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